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The Stooges : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Jac Holzman wondered what he had signed when he first saw the Stooges play to just seven people at a home gig in Detroit – they were terrible, with no obvious material. He insisted the group write original material. On April 1, 1969 in a small New York studio apartment, the Stooges recorded their monumental debut, The Stooges.  The album was subsequently unleashed during the weekend of the Woodstock Festival. It was produced by The Velvet Underground’s John Cale, fresh from arranging Nico’s deathly The Marble Index for Elektra.

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Bread : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Both the MC5 and The Stooges caused considerable grumbling among Elektra’s staff, as did polar opposites Bread, this time because of their perceived pop patina. Bread was formed in 1969, when leading producer/arranger and session man David Gates produced Pleasure Faire, a band that included guitarist Robb Royer and songwriter James Griffin.

As Bread, the three combined to create a polished, melodic soft-rock style, which on their second album, On The Waters, unleashed the chart topping single “Make It With You.” Further albums yielded major hits in “Baby I’m A Want You,” “Everything I Own,”

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Tom Rush : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Greenwich Village not only became a magnet for songwriters, it also attracted interpreters of folk and country blues. Nobody did it better than Tom Rush, a thoughtful, immaculate stylist who exquisitely adapted others’ material.

Rush emerged from the Boston and Cambridge scene, and by the time he signed to Elektra, he had already recorded two albums for Prestige in 1963 that revealed him to be an accomplished bottleneck guitarist. His Elektra debut, Tom Rush, is simply masterful, and his version of Bukka White‘s “The Panama Limited” beyond compare.

When Rush came to record his second LP, Take

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Carly Simon : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Carly Simon was born into a successful publishing family in New York City.  She first performed and recorded with her sister Lucy as The Simon Sisters. When Lucy married, they stopped performing together, and Carly began writing her own songs.  When her debut album, Carly Simon, was released in 1971, the era of new singer-songwriters was unfolding. Her well-bred voice and sophistication were the perfect combination to convey the subtle sense of “relationships” inherent in her writing.

Holzman chose “That’s The Way I’ve Always Heard It Should Be” as the first single, which become a

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Harry Chapin : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Harry Chapin enjoyed a full creative life before his recording career with Elektra took flight. Immensely talented, as both a writer and filmmaker, he earned an Academy Award nomination in 1968 for Legendary Champions, a documentary film about boxing that he wrote and directed. Chapin was simultaneously working the clubs as the Chapin Brothers (with brothers Tom and Stephen), but by 1971, found his special niche as a writer and performer. He formed a group designed to convey the inner light of his storytelling songs through an unusual line-up: two guitars with bass and cello accompaniment.

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