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Tim Buckley : Biography

Tim Buckley : Biography
General November 14, 2010
  • Tim Buckley is in a long line of true originals that signed to Elektra in the ‘60s. Jac Holzman signed him on the strength of a six-track demo, smitten by an exquisite voice that simply got better, expanding in its range and scale of expectation. After the introductory Tim Buckley, which glimpsed at what was to come, 1967’s Goodbye And Hello was an intricate, elaborately arranged series of poetic songs capped by the epic title track and haunting “Once I Was” and “Morning Glory.”

    By Happy Sad, barely a year later, Buckley's voice had become an instrument in itself, free of convention and set in a more laid back, jazzier context – looser and dreamier. It was Tim Buckley’s equivalent of Miles Davis’s A Kind Of Blue.

    Tim Buckley’s ambition was fuelled by a voice that could take him anywhere. His original fans found themselves even more puzzled by the even more daring improvisations of his final Elektra release, Lorca.  He had now completely abandoned his folk troubadour beginnings. For Tim Buckley, it was always about the music and even the forward-thinking Jac Holzman admits he failed to understand and appreciate Tim Buckley’s final Elektra masterpiece, Lorca, until years later.

Geneva's picture
on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Tim Buckley is in a long line of true originals that signed to Elektra in the ‘60s. Jac Holzman signed him on the strength of a six-track demo, smitten by an exquisite voice that simply got better, expanding in its range and scale of expectation. After the introductory Tim Buckley, which glimpsed at what was to come, 1967’s Goodbye And Hello was an intricate, elaborately arranged series of poetic songs capped by the epic title track and haunting “Once I Was” and “Morning Glory.”

By Happy Sad, barely a year later, Buckley's voice had become an instrument in itself, free of convention and set in a more laid back, jazzier context – looser and dreamier. It was Tim Buckley’s equivalent of Miles Davis’s A Kind Of Blue.

Tim Buckley’s ambition was fuelled by a voice that could take him anywhere. His original fans found themselves even more puzzled by the even more daring improvisations of his final Elektra release, Lorca.  He had now completely abandoned his folk troubadour beginnings. For Tim Buckley, it was always about the music and even the forward-thinking Jac Holzman admits he failed to understand and appreciate Tim Buckley’s final Elektra masterpiece, Lorca, until years later.

Artist: 
Tim Buckley