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Elektra Records

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The Doors: Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

When The Doors topped the charts at #1 in July 1967 with “Light My Fire,” it was the supreme validation for Jac Holzman after 16 years of nurturing Elektra Records.  Elektra would no longer be perceived as “a small independent folk label.”  The Doors changed Elektra’s trajectory forever.

Taken from their self-titled debut album, “Light My Fire” was barely off the charts when Strange Days was released, proving that The Doors were no mere one-shot band.

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The Stooges : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Jac Holzman wondered what he had signed when he first saw the Stooges play to just seven people at a home gig in Detroit – they were terrible, with no obvious material. He insisted the group write original material. On April 1, 1969 in a small New York studio apartment, the Stooges recorded their monumental debut, The Stooges.  The album was subsequently unleashed during the weekend of the Woodstock Festival. It was produced by The Velvet Underground’s John Cale, fresh from arranging Nico’s deathly The Marble Index for Elektra.

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Love : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Jac Holzman saw Love in 1966 at a performance at Bido Lido’s in Hollywood. Holzman grasped the group’s enormous potential and viewed the flamboyant, wild, mercurial nature of leader Arthur Lee as a performance plus. Love gave Elektra its first taste of pop success with “My Little Red Book” from their self- titled debut album, and the relentlessly explosive “‘Seven And Seven Is” (produced by Holzman) from the more richly textured Da Capo album. Da Capo only hinted at the imaginative approach and orchestral delights that were to come in their third album, Forever Changes.

Now regarded as one of

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Incredible String Band : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

The only UK group of any reputation signed to Elektra until Jac Holzman signed Queen in 1972, The Incredible String Band were the ultimate, eclectic folk act, produced by Joe Boyd, then running Elektra’s London office. After one, essentially traditional folk album, recorded as a trio, the duo of Mike Heron and Robin Williamson veered off into a more esoteric direction.

Utilizing unfamiliar instrumentation, 1967’s 5000 Spirits Or The Layers Of The Onion saw them become darlings of the UK underground scene. 5000 Spirits was effectively the Sgt. Pepper of the folk world with its genre-defining

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The Paul Butterfield Blues Band : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band was crucial to Elektra’s shift from folk and blues into rock. The core group included spellbinding guitarist Mike Bloomfield, led by harmonica man Paul Butterfield.

Bloomfield and Butterfield backed Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965 where by famously plugging in, Dylan pointed to the future for those prepared to listen. The Butterfield Band’s self-titled debut that same year was already motivating young white kids to play high-energy electric blues.

The band’s second album, East-West, spun off into an entirely different direction, its long

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