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Elektra Records

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Judy Collins : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Judy Collins released her debut album, A Maid Of Constant Sorrow, in 1961. Vocally she seemed indebted to Joan Baez, but no one could have predicted the adventurous musical path she would blaze for herself.

Blessed with a crystalline voice and an immaculate instinct for great songs, Judy moved from traditional folk to become a champion of contemporary songwriters including Bob Dylan, Tom Paxton, Erik Anderson, and Gordon Lightfoot. This process began with the pivotal Judy Collins 3.  The album cover was a stunner, a full-sized head shot with those piercing, deep blue eyes. 1966's In My Life

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Koerner, Ray & Glover : Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

In 1963, Jac Holzman discovered the debut album by Koerner, Ray & Glover, Blues Rags And Hollers, originally appearing on the Audiophile label and sold only at gigs. Slightly re-vamped, it was given a full release by Elektra.

John Koerner, Dave Ray, and Tony Glover were young white country blues fanatics, like Bob Dylan, from Minneapolis. They played basic, committed roots music. The Doors’ Robbie Krieger was a huge fan of the trio, whose brash seven and 12-string guitars combined with Glover‘s gutsy harmonica. “It had a real beat,” says Krieger, “‘even though they didn‘t use bass or drums.”

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Theo Bikel: Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Born in Vienna before moving to Palestine at the age of 13, Theodore Bikel arrived in New York from London, where he had already begun to make a name for himself as an actor. He made his Broadway debut in 1955 in The Love of Four Colonels, before making his film debut in The African Queen two years later.

At the time, Bikel had no ambition to record, but Jac Holzman saw him perform at a Greenwich Village party where “he blew the lid off the place.” Holzman suggested he record an album of Israeli folk songs, released in 1955 as Folk Songs Of Israel. It began a long, 15-album partnership

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Josh White: Biography

on November 14, 2010 - 12:00am

Josh White’s earliest recordings in the ‘30s were “race records” intended for the black, rural population; but White later crossed over to a predominantly white audience. “One Meat Ball,” for the Asch label, was a depression-era song that became the first million-selling record by a black male artist.

More a cabaret singer by the late ‘40s, White became a leading voice of black America and a voice that repeatedly reminded America of its social injustices.

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